Pleiades – M45

also known as the Seven Sisters and Messier 45, are an open star cluster containing middle-aged, hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the star clusters nearest Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Reflection nebulae around the brightest stars were once thought to be left over material from the formation of the cluster, but are now considered likely to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium through which the stars are currently passing.

Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades were probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades

Plejady / Pleiades - M45

These are my first Pleiades for a just modified NEQ6Pro, assembly with belt drive instead of gears and new bearings. I modified the mount myself and after this photo session I see what else I need to improve and what activities I did not take to know and what mistakes I made.

At the first night I realized, that I had not aligned the polar scope axis with the mount, which practically prevented me from setting the mount to polar correctly. I had no idea that this should be done. Because of that the first photo session is just only 90 [s] exposure. That’s all I could get without the correct align of mount to polar. The next day I did my “lessons” and in the evening when the polar appeared in the sky, I aligned the mount axis as much as possible at -10 ° [C] degree by turning three tiny screws with a tiny allen key, in poor light, without winter gloves on my hands, until I was able to keep the key in this freeze night.

I aligned the mount as it was possible to carry out exposure of about 150 [s] at 1000/200 [mm] focal length of my telescope without guidng, but every second / third frame was still with traveling stars. I reduced the exposure time to 2 [min] to reduce the amount of waste material, still I had every 4-6 frame broken. I determined that the axle clearance pressure was set incorrectly in one of axis, which caused a noticeable small play, which I still have to cancel by adjusting the pressure.

I will refine the assembly and improve the results. When my Mgen Lacerta II comes back to me, then this assembly with this tube will show a what deserve. I hope.

Photos taken on 23-25.1.2020 at Żabnica with company of a friend Tomasz Siekiera, who made the square available for astrophotography. Thanks Tomek! 🙂

Equipment:

  • Canon EOS 6D (no mod.),
  • SkyWatcher Newton 1000/200 [mm] F5,
  • Coma corrector,
  • NEQ6Pro modification with some mistakes in the calibration process I’ve made due to my knowledge gaps. I’ll work on it in the near future.

Stacking, composition and data:

  • Astro Pixel Processor
  • GIMP v2.10.14 + plug-ins (Linux)
  • Lights in the two session: 175 x 90[s] ISO 1600 + 32 x 120[s] ISO 1600 = 207 – 10% bad quality rejected frames = 186 best frames with different time exposure,
  • Flats: 35 ISO-1600,
  • Dark Flats: 42 ISO-1600,
  • Darks: 42 ISO-1600,
  • Bias: 20 ISO-1600


The Rho Ophiuchi Nebula – Antares

is a multiple star system in the constellation Ophiuchus. The central system has an apparent magnitude of 4.63. Based on the central system’s parallax of 9.03 mas, it is located about 360 light-years (110 parsecs) away. The other stars in the system are slightly farther away. Rho Ophiuchi is the namesake of the Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex. It is a nebula of gas and dust, which the Rho Ophiuchi system is embedded in. It is one of the easiest star forming regions to observe, as it is one of the nearest, and it is visible from both hemispheres.

The interstellar extinction of Rho Ophiuchi is measured to be 1.45 magnitudes, meaning the dust and gas in front of Rho Ophiuchi absorbs light from the system, making it appear 1.45 magnitudes dimmer than it should be. Additionally, gas and dust also scatters more higher-frequency light, leaving the light appearing more reddish. The interstellar reddening of Rho Ophiuchi has been measured to be 0.47 magnitudes.

Rho Ophiuchi Nebula - Antares

This is my first processing with material collected in two different sessions, with different exposure parameters. It was a bit of work with it but I have a new skill now 😉

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rho_Ophiuchi

Photos (June 2019) taken at Tenerife, exactly in the place next to “God’s finger”. A great place for astrophotography during night.

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D (no mod!) with a Canon EF 200 [mm] 2.8L II USM lens, on a damaged iOptron CEM 25 mount.

  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor,
  • Processing: GIMP v2.10.12 + plug-ins (Linux),
  • Lights: 19 x 130[s] ISO 640 + 48 x 60[x] ISO 800,
  • Flats: 40 ISO-640 + 40 ISO-800,
  • Darks: 10 ISO-640 + 19 IS-800,
  • Bias: 20 ISO-640 + 20 ISO-800

NGC 6541 & M25

NGC 6541 (GCL 86 or ESO 280-SC4) – is a globular cluster in the southern constellation of Corona Australis. It is estimated to be around 14 billion years old. 6.3 [mag]. Distance from Sun 24,5 tly.

NGC 6541, M25 - Zoom

M25 (IC4725) – is an open cluster of stars in the southern constellation of Sagittarius. The cluster is located near some obscuring features, with a dark lane passing near the center. M25 is at a distance of about 2,000 light-years light-years away from Earth and is 67.6 million years old. The spatial dimension of this cluster is about 13 light-years across.

Photos (June 2019) taken at Tenerife, exactly in the place next to “God’s finger”. A great place for astrophotography during night and long conversations about the nature of time, speed of light, wondering if life exists in other planetary systems…

NGC6541-M25_v1-zoom.png

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D (no mod) with a Canon EF 200 [mm] 2.8L II USM lens, on a glued iOptron CEM 25 mount, which I accidentally earlier crashed on beton.

  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor,
  • Processing: GIMP v2.10.14 + plug-ins (Linux),
  • Lights: 10 x 90[s] ISO 1000,
  • Flats: 40 ISO-1000,
  • Darks: 17 ISO-1000,
  • Bias: 20 ISO-1000


The Lagoon Nebula – M8 (NGC 6533)

Is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region. The Lagoon Nebula is estimated to be between 4,000-6,000 light-years away from the Earth. In the sky of Earth, it spans 90′ by 40′, which translates to an actual dimension of 110 by 50 light years. Like many nebulas, it appears pink in time-exposure color photos but is gray to the eye peering through binoculars or a telescope, human vision having poor color sensitivity at low light levels.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagoon_Nebula

Mgławica Laguna - M8 (NGC 6533) z powiększeniami

Photos (June 2019) taken at Tenerife, exactly in the place next to “God’s finger”. A great place for astrophotography during night and long conversations about the nature of time, speed of light, wondering if life exists in other planetary systems together with great company, especially with Karol, Magda and Maciek. With those people I want to return there indefinitely.

Mgławica Laguna - M8 (NGC 6533)

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D (no mod!) with a Canon EF 200 [mm] 2.8L II USM lens, on a glued iOptron CEM 25 mount, which I accidentally crashed on beton. The next day at the hotel, I disassembled it, made possible repairs, and glued it with a drop glue bought in a nearby store. After switching on, it start to works but it had a leeway thwart of about 1 – 3 [mm] on the head, which meant that I could not take light frames exposure for more than about 90 [s]. I was lucky enough to use it at all and all this with the outstanding help of my friend Maciek, a very kind and willing person to help without whom, it is possible that would come back with nothing from Tenerife. Thank you Maciej.

  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor,
  • Processing: GIMP v2.10.12 + plug-ins (Linux),
  • Lights: 42 x 89[s] ISO 1000,
  • Flats: 40 ISO-1000,
  • Darks: 17 ISO-1000,
  • Bias: 20 ISO-1000