Leo Triplet

Also known as the M66 Group is a small group of galaxies about 35 million light-years away[5] in the constellation Leo. This galaxy group consists of the spiral galaxies M65, M66, and NGC 3628.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Triplet

Grupa M66 – Triplet Lwa

Full resolution: http://www.astrofoto.pekdar.net/wp-content/uploads/wppa-source/album-8/Triplet_Lwa-v1.png

The first test photo taken on the new Orion Optics CT-10 telescope on a modified assembly (gears replaced with belts + new bearings) NEQ6Pro. I did not collimate the telescope, I used it as it came from the supplier. You can see with the stars that I need to improve collimation. Flats didn’t work out as they should, but I somehow corrected it in the GIMP. The coma corrector I used with the previous Newton 1000/200 [mm] did not like this telescope model too much. The IDAS LPS-D2 48mm LP filter, which I used for the first time, passed the 5+ exam. This set will need to be further improved.

Grupa M66 – Triplet Lwa - powiększenia galaktyk

Full resolution: http://www.astrofoto.pekdar.net/wp-content/uploads/wppa-source/album-8/Triplet_Lwa-v1-zoom.png

Photos taken during night at 14/15-3.2020 near Bielsko-Biała city.

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D, O.O. CT-10 1200/250 [mm], F4.75, coma corrector, IDAS LPS-D2 48 [mm], NEQ6Pro.,

  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor v1.077-6,
  • Processing: GIMP v2.10.14 + plug-ins (Linux),
  • Lights: 57 x 180[s] ISO-800,
  • Flats: 24 ISO-800,
  • Darks: 15 ISO-800,
  • Bias: 20 ISO-800

Milky Way – mosaic of three frames

This is mosaic of three frames, manually set. I had four frames done but the third in the queue was bad quality and went to trash. This is my first mosaic. It is a pity that I could not set the frame, which is why the picture is not complete. In overall, the final photo is not so bad. I remember getting a bit tired of setting these frames, it is not as easy to do as it may seem. Certainly, the ideal support for such a “work” will be a computer with the solid software that will align the frames each other as they should be with some overlap.

Droga Mleczna / Milky Way - mozaika 3 kadrów

Full resolution: http://www.astrofoto.pekdar.net/wp-content/uploads/wppa-source/album-6/DrogaMleczna_mozaika3kadrow_v3gotowe.png

Photos taken at 02 Jun 2019 on Tenerife, exactly in the place next to “God’s finger”. Great expedition with PTMA.

As usual, I couldn’t decide which picture is better. Version with the actual number of stars or reduced. Personally, I like both and I also post both. Certainly the “without” stars version is not suitable for viewing at high magnifications, till some reasonable level you can. It is better to magnify the “with stars” version.

ATTENTION! Pictures are big, resolution: 16445 x 4136 [px]

  • PNG size: 146 [MB]
  • JPG size with 99% of quality set: 58,6 [MB]
Droga Mleczna / Milky Way - mozaika 3 kadrów i redukcja gwiazd

Full resolution: http://www.astrofoto.pekdar.net/wp-content/uploads/wppa-source/album-6/DrogaMleczna_mozaika3kadrow_v3-lessStars.png

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D with a Canon Canon EF 24-105 [mm] F3.5-5.6 IS STM lens, on damaged iOptron CEM 25 mount with limited functionality.

  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor v1.077-6 and v1.075,
  • Processing: GIMP v2.10.14 + plug-ins (Linux),
  • Lights: frame nr 1 – 10 x 60 [s], frame nr 2 – 9 x 60 [s], kadr nr 3 – 10 x 60 [s], ISO-1000
  • Darks: 14 ISO-1000,
  • Bias: 20 ISO-1000

Milky Way

Our galaxy contains a bar, which astronomers have proven some time ago and what you can not see in these photos. Well … the equipment available to professional astronomers allows them to see what a regular camera with a 200 [mm] lens certainly won’t see for us. Apparently, our galaxy has about 400 billion stars, estimated. I was wondering… how they estimated it?

Droga Mleczna / Milky Way

Full resolution: http://www.astrofoto.pekdar.net/wp-content/uploads/wppa-source/album-6/DrogaMleczna_jeden_kadr_v3.png

In the pictures presented, an expert and familiar eye will see many well-known and often photographed objects. What? Where? Well I’ll leave it you to discover in these photos. One of the photo presents the most visible ones.

Droga Mleczna / Milky Way - zredukowane gwiazdy

Full resolution: http://www.astrofoto.pekdar.net/wp-content/uploads/wppa-source/album-6/DrogaMleczna_jeden_kadr_v3_lessStars.png

Photos taken at 02 Jun 2019 on Tenerife, exactly in the place next to “God’s finger”.

Droga Mleczna / Milky Way with zooms

Full resolution: http://www.astrofoto.pekdar.net/wp-content/uploads/wppa-source/album-6/DrogaMleczna_jeden_kadr_v3_zoom.png

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D with a Canon Canon EF 24-105 [mm] F3.5-5.6 IS STM lens, on a glued iOptron CEM 25 mount, which I accidentally crashed on beton.

  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor v1.077-6,
  • Processing: GIMP v2.10.14 + plug-ins (Linux),
  • Lights: 10 x 60[s] ISO-1000,
  • Flats: 42 ISO-1000,
  • Darks: 14 ISO-1000,
  • Bias: 20 ISO-1000

M6 & M7

The Butterfly Cluster (M6 and as NGC 6405) – in the picture zoomed above – is an open cluster of stars in the southern constellation of Scorpius. Its name derives from the vague resemblance of its shape to a butterfly.

Estimates of distance 1,590 light-years, giving it a spatial dimension of some 12 light years. Modern measurements show its total visual brightness to be magnitude 4.2. The cluster is estimated to be 94.2 million years old.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly_Cluster

Gromada Motyl (M6) i Gromada Ptolemeusza (M7)

The Ptolemy Cluster (M7 and as NGC 6475) – in the picture zoomed below – is an open cluster of stars in the constellation of Scorpius. The cluster is easily detectable with the naked eye, close to the “stinger” of Scorpius. With a declination of −34.8°, it is the southernmost Messier object.

M7 has been known since antiquity; it was first recorded by the 2nd-century Greek-Roman astronomer Ptolemy, who described it as a nebula in 130 AD.

Telescopic observations of the cluster reveal about 80 stars within a field of view of 1.3° across. At the cluster’s estimated distance of 980 light years this corresponds to an actual diameter of 25 light years. The tidal radius of the cluster is 40.1 ly (12.3 pc) and it has a combined mass of about 735 times the mass of the Sun. The age of the cluster is around 200 million years while the brightest member star is of magnitude 5.6. In terms of composition, the cluster contains a similar abundance of elements other than hydrogen and helium as the Sun.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messier_7

Gromada Motyl (M6) i Gromada Ptolemeusza (M7) - Zoom

Photos (31.5.2019) taken at Tenerife, exactly in the place next to “God’s finger”.

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D with a Canon EF 200 [mm] 2.8L II USM lens, on a glued iOptron CEM 25 mount, which I accidentally crashed on beton.

  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor,
  • Processing: GIMP v2.10.12 + plug-ins (Linux),
  • Lights: 62 x 60[s] ISO 800,
  • Flats: 60 ISO 800,
  • Darks: 21 ISO 800,
  • Bias: 20 ISO 800