Moon – just after full

The sky was interspersed with clouds. Once there were cirrus’s, sometimes they were cumulus clouds, but there were also windows between them to try to take a test the new equipment and photograph something. The tests were successful, but the atmosphere was waving. Moon on top.

Moon – just after full

Equipment:

  • Atik Horizon,
  • Newton CT10 250/1200 [mm], F4,8,
  • NEQ6Pro mod.

M101 / NGC 5457 – Pinwheel Galaxy

is a face-on spiral galaxy distanced 21 million light-years (six megaparsecs) away from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. M101 is a large galaxy, with a diameter of 170,000 light-years. By comparison, the Milky Way has a diameter of 100,000 light years. It has around a trillion stars, twice the number in the Milky Way. It has a disk mass on the order of 100 billion solar masses, along with a small central bulge of about 3 billion solar masses.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andromeda_Galaxy

Pinwheel Galaxy (M101 / NGC 5457)

A good example showing how a coma mirror can break a nice picture. I’ve hope, that the coma corrector I will buy in the coming week, will eliminate the above mentioned optical defect in the entire camera frame.

M101 / NGC 5457 - Pinwheel Galaxy - 50% crop
  • Photos taken at May 2020,
  • Equipment: Canon EOS 6D, CT10 Newton 1200/250[mm], F4.8, NEQ6Pro.,
  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor,
  • Processing: GIMP + plug-ins,
  • Lights: 81 x 120[s], ISO 1600,
  • Correction frames: Flats, DarkFlats, Darks, Bias

NGC 869 oraz NGC 884 – Double Cluster

Also known as Caldwell 14 or open clusters NGC 869 and NGC 884, ( often designated h Persei and χ Persei, respectively), which are close together in the constellation Perseus. Both visible with the naked eye, NGC 869 and NGC 884 lie at a distance of 7,500 light years.

There are more than 300 blue-white super-giant stars in each of the clusters. The clusters are also blueshifted, with NGC 869 approaching Earth at a speed of 39 km/s (24 mi/s) and NGC 884 approaching at a similar speed of 38 km/s (24 mi/s). Their hottest main sequence stars are of spectral type B0.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Cluster

Double Cluster – also known as Caldwell 14 or open clusters NGC 869 and NGC 884

I remember the first time, I saw both clusters in the eyepiece of my old Newton 1000/200 [mm]. My eye stuck to the lens. I couldn’t take my eyes off it.

Unfortunately, I did not capture both clusters as I would like, the coma corrector was not well matched as seen on the edge of the frame. It will be better next time. I promise 😉

Photos taken on August 2019 at Bieszczady with PTMA rally.

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D, SkyWatcher Newton 1000/200 [mm], F5, coma corrector, NEQ6Pro.,

  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor,
  • Processing: GIMP v2.10.14 + plug-ins (Linux),
  • Lights: 24 x 96[s] ISO 1250,
  • Flats, Darks, Bias.

Albireo (Beta Cygni, β Cyg)

Is a double star designated Beta Cygni (β Cygni, abbreviated Beta Cyg, β Cyg). Beta Cygni is about 415 light-years (127 pc) away from the Sun. When viewed with the naked eye, Albireo appears to be a single star. However, in a telescope it resolves into a double star consisting of β Cygni A (amber, apparent magnitude 3.1), and β Cygni B (blue-green, apparent magnitude 5.1). Separated by 35 seconds of arc,[16] the two components provide one of the best contrasting double stars in the sky due to their different colors.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albireo

Albireo (Beta Cygni, β Cyg)

Somehow I have a weakness for this pair of stars. Whenever I look at them through the telescope eyepiece, I am fascinated with their colors and that they are so close together.

Albireo (Beta Cygni, β Cyg) with zoom

I’ve collected light frames with few different sessions. Photos taken on 2019 at Zwardoń and Bieszczady during PTMA rally.

Albireo (Beta Cygni, β Cyg) with bacground stars darker

  • Equipment: Canon EOS 6D, SkyWatcher Newton 1000/200 [mm], F5, coma corrector, NEQ6Pro.,
  • Composition: Astro Pixel Processor,
  • Processing: GIMP + plug-ins (Linux).